• Kelan River Taroko National Park
  • Plyons Princess Pier
  • Little Penguins St Kilda Pier
  • Panaroma Yarra Valley
  • Chandon Yarra Valley
  • Bidding Goodbye Koh Lipe
  • Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall Taipei
  • Pebbles QiXingTan Beach
  • Candle Rocks Yehliu Geopark
  • Nanya Rock Formations Taipei
Slider Javascript by WOWSlider.com v4.8

6 February 2014

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi during Lunar New Year Celebration 2013

Under the hot and humid climate of Penang, four Penangites strolled along the old streets of Georgetown into the gates of Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi or in short Khoo Kongsi. Leong San Tong (“Dragon Mountain Hall”), one of the most majestic clan house in South East Asia is literally a hidden treasure as it stays barricaded within the crowded gridiron of terrace houses and shop houses along Cannon and Armenian Street.

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Rows of 19th century terrace houses before entering the main courtyard

The forefathers of the Khoo Clan came from Sin Kang Seah, Sin Aun village, Hokkien province, China.The original Chinese character ‘Khoo’ was written as 丘(Qiu), however during the Qing dynasty, the Emperor ordered those having this surname to add the radical becoming 邱 as a mark of respect for the sage Confucius whose personal name was 丘.

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
The magnificence and grandeur of Leong San Tong rooted on the granite tiles, embellished with intricate carvings on stones and wood of superior quality and rich ornaments marking the pinnacle of craftsmanship from China

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Green stone male lion guarding the courtyard as well as the clanhouse
 
Prayer Pavilion and Main Building

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi

In 1850, the present site of Leong San Tong (97,035 sq. ft.) was bought by the Khoos. At that time, there stood a British owned local bungalow which was then converted into Leong San Tong, in which the deity of Tua Sai Yah and ancestral tablets from Sin Kang were enshrined. This Hall was mainly used for gathering, ancestral worship and weddings.

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Plaque of Leong San Tong at the front entrance of Cheng Soon Keong temple (正顺宫)

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Cheng Soon Keong, the central hall of Leong San Tong, enshrines Ong Soon Yah (the Great Duke) and Tua Sai Yah (the Noble)  who are the patron saints of the Khoos

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Western tigers roaming in the woods (top left), Eastern dragon in the cloud and sea facing China (top right); Laughing monk sitting on pennies (bottom left), Crying monk (bottom right) depicting the coexistence of joy and sorrow of life

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
The octagonal columns at the veranda of the upper floor of the main hall are made of a single piece of green stone with carvings of immortals and other auspicious animals

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
In the building, a total of 12 ‘diao lan’ (hanging basket) hang under the eaves of the main hall and prayer pavilion

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Round ventilated window features the “Observation Pavilion”

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Back then, most of the Sikhs served as guards
Kitchen

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Typical Southern Fujian styled kitchen

Opera Stage

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
Opera stage directly opposite Leong San Tong, still used for stage performance and other entertainments

Left Room (now the clan museum)

Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi

Address: 18, Cannon Square, 10200 Penang, Malaysia
Tel/ Fax: 604-2642119 (Ticketing Office); 604-2614609 (Administrative Office)
Website: www.khookongsi.com.my
Opening Hours: 9:00am to 5:00pm daily

Entrance Fee: Children RM1, Adult RM10 (Discount may apply for student card holders, I got mine for RM1, visitors with a surname of Khoo might get free entry)

Nearby sights:  Acheh Street Mosque, Poh Hock Seah, 120 Armenian Street (Dr Sun Yat Sen’s Penang Base), Yap Kongsi, Cheah Kongsi, Lim Kongsi, Armenian Street Mural (Girl and boy on bicycle), Ah Quee Street Mural (Boy on bike), Cannon Street Mural (boy on chair)